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Internet of Things

April 10, 2020

A decade-old, blockchain technology is facing an inflection point. A few years ago it was easy to find people who were evangelically enthusiastic about it. A 2015 World Economic Forum survey of more than 800 executives and experts from the information and communications technology sector found the majority believed that by 2027, 10% of global GDP would be stored on blockchain technology.

Facebook’s Libra launch shows blockchain has entered the mainstream. Jeremy Hazlehurst looks at what the technology really means for family businesses

A decade-old, blockchain technology is facing an inflection point. A few years ago it was easy to find people who were evangelically enthusiastic about it. A 2015 World Economic Forum survey of more than 800 executives and experts from the information and communications technology sector found the majority believed that by 2027, 10% of global GDP would be stored on blockchain technology.

February 5, 2019

With industrial and consumer uptake growing exponentially, the Internet of Things is disrupting the way businesses operate. Scott McCulloch explores the implications for family firms

With industrial and consumer uptake growing exponentially, the Internet of Things is disrupting the way businesses operate. Scott McCulloch explores the implications for family firms

Think of the billions of physical devices connected to the internet, devices that collect and share data, and you get a sense of the Internet of Things (IoT).

November 14, 2018

The overwhelming majority of family businesses in Asia have experienced technological disruption, but less than half are ready to adapt to the advent of big data, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, renewable energy or robotics.

The overwhelming majority of family businesses in Asia have experienced technological disruption, but less than half are ready to adapt to the advent of big data, artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, renewable energy or robotics.

While more than 60% of families took steps to understand the nature of disruptive technologies, only one-third have developed a clear perspective on the future direction for their own industry, a new report by Lombard Odier found.

October 8, 2018

With cybersecurity breaches at well-known companies hitting the headlines, it is easy to believe that family offices which maintain a low profile would not be a prime target for digital fraud.

With cybersecurity breaches at well-known companies hitting the headlines, it is easy to believe that family offices which maintain a low profile would not be a prime target for digital fraud.

However, this ignores the attractiveness of the information that is stored by a family office, their advisers and their financial institutions—information and data which is potentially useful to criminals who wish to steal from, harm or damage the reputation of a wealthy family.

August 7, 2014

Almost two decades since the concept of disruptive innovation was thrust into public consciousness, companies have both risen and fallen prey to the process. Kodak was a loser, Amazon was a winner, and the iPhone alone has disrupted a number of technologies – cameras, alarm clocks and radios, to name a few.

Almost two decades since the concept of disruptive innovation was thrust into public consciousness, companies have both risen and fallen prey to the process. Kodak was a loser, Amazon was a winner, and the iPhone alone has disrupted a number of technologies – cameras, alarm clocks and radios, to name a few.

But this June Harvard Business School professor Jill Lepore argued it was time to give the concept (whereby new innovations suddenly shake up the marketplace, replacing predecessor technologies) a rest.

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