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January 30, 2014

From its beginnings supplying the theatres springing up in the early days of London’s West End to a £10-million-a-year business, the history of Angels the Costumiers is a glamorous mix of theatre, film and fashion. 

From its beginnings supplying the theatres springing up in the early days of London’s West End to a £10-million-a-year business, the history of Angels the Costumiers is a glamorous mix of theatre, film and fashion.

January 20, 2014

Socially responsible investing has got the backing of famous names, has seen a huge rise in assets under management and is focused on the future, but are family offices actually interested? CampdenFB takes a look

January 1, 2014

With email pushing the utilitarian value of stamps towards redundancy, what will become of the world’s philatelic collections and how do they stand as an investment?Campden reports.
 

As a child growing up in 1960s America, Donald Sundman’s father gave him a stamp album and some inexpensive stamps. “I lived in a small town in New Hampshire and so stamps were really a window into a larger world, where you could see stamps from countries that didn’t exist anymore, because World War I and World War II changed the map so much, and there were different languages. It was very exotic.”

December 2, 2013

Impact investing is an area that family offices have shown cautious interest in, but a new G8 task force is set to tackle some of the issues holding them back. Campden takes a look.

Back in the 1970s and 1980s, venture capital and private equity were a glint in people’s eyes, says Sir Ronald Cohen, founder of Apax Partners, but institutions felt something exciting was about to happen in the space. Today, Cohen – the so called “father of British venture capital” – has a sense of déjà vu, because he feels impact investing is at the same stage in its evolution and the industry is set to take off.

November 6, 2013

John Elkann heads one of the world’s biggest conglomerates. But he wants to be more than just another boss of a big multinational. He wants to change the world. CampdenFB reports.

John Elkann is on a mission. The fifth-generation owner and manager of one of the biggest industrial groups in the world wants capitalism to change. With his boyish face, soft voice, reserved – even diffident – style he might make an unlikely evangelist, but he is deadly serious.

October 17, 2013

This summer big brand artists continued to set records at the major auction houses. But like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio? 

This summer big brand artists continued to set records at the major auction houses. But like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio? 

October 9, 2013

A top athlete’s name, money and drive can be an incredible boost for a charity, but does a career at the pinnacle of sport prepare you for life as a philanthropist? CampdenFB reports

After the final slog towards the Arc de Triomphe on the last leg of the 2005 Tour de France, world famous cyclist Lance Armstrong took to the podium to take the yellow jersey for a record-breaking seventh time.

Over the course of his career “le Boss” had become a household name – his tale made all the more powerful because it was a near miracle that he had ever raced at all. At the age of 25, Armstrong had been diagnosed with advanced testicular cancer, and even after hasty surgery doctors had only given him a 40% chance of survival. But survive he did.

September 26, 2013

The Koffler Group, a US-based family office, has traditionally travelled light when it comes to debt, but Campden talks to the third-gen who has been fearless in making sure it now has a mixed bag of investments.

The family fortune may have been made by an inherently conservative investor with a flair for designing suitcases, but when it comes to investment strategy subsequent generations of the Koffler family have been determined not to carry any baggage.

Sol Koffler is a poster child for the American dream. Arriving in the US from eastern Europe in 1920 at the age of 13, he started selling $1 suitcases as the Great Depression reached its peak. Over the next 46 years he built American Tourister into the second largest luggage company in the country.

September 17, 2013

Most global equity markets have recovered sharply in the last year, but that doesn’t mean family offices are piling in, as many of them still remain wary of risk. Campden reports. 

Don't mention the B-word – Bernanke. When the chairman of the Federal Reserve suggested the Fed was starting to think about winding down its asset-purchasing programme investors started heading for the exits, and US equities – not to mention assets in emerging markets, which had benefitted from the global search for yield – nose-dived.

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