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October 26, 2009

For high-flying multi-skilled women, working in a family office can offer an exciting challenge. Jane Simms interviews two women who have made the family office environment their home, with differing experiences

Terri Chernick never intended to join the family business. She wanted to be a doctor. "I was the black sheep of the family. I wanted to go off and do my own thing," she recalls. "In the idealistic way that young people have, I wanted to 'make a contribution to society', and because I loved the sciences I entered Brown University as a premed."

August 26, 2009

Over the last two generations great shifts have occurred in the expectations and opportunities available to women, and ultra high net worth women are no exception

Over the last two generations great shifts have occurred in the expectations and opportunities available to women, and ultra high net worth women are no exception. We have emerged from a world where gender expectations were set and adhered to, into one where they are fluid and challenged. Women now take prominent roles in the family business, inherit equally with their male siblings and create their own wealth.

April 27, 2009

Jane Simms profiles two leading ladies who are blazing a trail for the fairer sex in India.

Meher Pudumjee, chairperson of Thermax Limited, the family business set up by her maternal grandfather some 40 years ago, is testimony to just how quickly the role of women in family businesses is changing in India.

She joined the board of Thermax, which produces energy and environmental systems for industrial customers around the world, in 1996 after the sudden death of her father, becoming non-executive chairman four years later. She had first joined the company aged 21, straight after a degree in chemical engineering at Imperial College, London.

April 23, 2009

Novelist Edith Wharton once wrote that the only way not to think about money is to have a great deal of it. While this may have been the case during the US author’s lifetime, which ended just after the Great Depression, wealthy women in the post-credit crunch world are not only thinking hard about the money they have, they are taking control of it too.

Novelist Edith Wharton once wrote that the only way not to think about money is to have a great deal of it, writes Marc Smith. While this may have been the case during the US author's lifetime, which ended just after the Great Depression, wealthy women in the post-credit crunch world are not only thinking hard about the money they have, they are taking control of it too.

April 16, 2009

Women of exceptional affluence are increasingly taking control of wealth management in their families, reflecting larger societal shifts that have taken place over the last few decades according to a new study.

Women of exceptional affluence are increasingly taking control of wealth management in their families, reflecting larger societal shifts that have taken place over the last few decades according to a new study.
 

July 31, 2008

A woman’s place in family business is not easily defined. More than any other organisation types, women can find themselves at the top quite quickly in family business.

A woman's place in family business is not easily defined. More than any other organisation types, women can find themselves at the top quite quickly in family business. But it is also where the role of the wife, mother and daughter can often play second fiddle to the father, son or even son-in-law.

Yet the lives and fortunes of women in family business are indelibly tied to the business itself and it is the women, more often than not, that bind the family together.

November 1, 2007

The gender gap in Latin America is still fairly large, but it is becoming increasingly common for a woman to run the family business. Jane Simms looks at the attitude towards working women in Latin America and those who have made it to the top

Jane Simms is a freelance journalist based in the UK.

The gender gap in Latin America is still fairly large, but it is becoming increasingly common for a woman to run the family business. Jane Simms looks at the attitude towards working women in Latin America and those who have made it to the top

July 1, 2006

Men still account for the lions’ share of entrepreneurial business, but reports indicate that women are fighting their ground. Research shows that women have the skills, all that’s missing is the confidence. Or perhaps they just don’t want to be involved, says Richard Willsher

Richard Willsher is a finance and business writer with a background in international investment banking. www.richardwillsher.com

Men still account for the lions' share of entrepreneurial business, but reports indicate that women are fighting their ground. Research shows that women have the skills, all that's missing is the confidence. Or perhaps they just don't want to be involved, says Richard Willsher

November 1, 2005

Women looking for a fast track to a seat on the board should join the family business, according to new research by Coutts. More than 60% of British family businesses have female directors.

Scott McCulloch is editor of Families in Business.

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